From Tradition to Table

by Brian Kaiser

Booze. Breakfast. Bonus.

It’s not so much that Drunch is a new concept—it’s that it was an inevitable one.

Barring football and complaining about parking, we can’t think of too many things that Columbus likes more than getting drunk and having brunch.

So thanks, Drunch, for opening the doors to a place that is unabashedly tugging at the few spare dollars we had left over from the rest of the city’s food and booze selections.

Look—breakfast any time of day can be had many places all around town, but no one is committing to it the way Drunch is, becoming the first place to serve brunch all-day (and night)—every day (and morning). Not to mention becoming the newest establishment in the growing Fourth Street corridor of Italian Village.

Drunch features upscale takes on the usual suspects. A two-egg fry-up, burgers, a few flatbreads.

But your gaze—and your gut—will be drawn to a few intriguing items right off the bat. The avocado fries are a nice starter that takes a trendy health food and gives it a good old-fashioned Midwest batter bath; and the potato skins, another staple of the Heartland, get a little extra pop from a fried egg atop each.

And that’s not even getting to the sweets. With a healthy cocktail list and the requisite craft beer selection, you may be tempted to drink your dessert, but you’d be missing out on a few signature items.

The banana bread French toast with rosemary chocolate will blow your hair back, a seemingly stoner conception carried out with culinary class. Same goes for the Fruity Pebbles cheesecake.

A novelty? A niche? To be certain. But then again what isn’t in the current Central Ohio restaurant landscape, where it takes a little something different to draw in the crowds. And no one in 2017 would be smart to bet against nostalgia.

Did we ever even know we wanted a restaurant with arcade games, where we can also order cereal and a baked cookie?

“Everyone has French toast—but no one has that French toast,” said manager Kayla Hawk. “We serve breakfast all day, and you can come here at 8 o’clock at night and have chicken and waffles. No one else does that.”

The only problem is: if you can get dinner in the morning and breakfast at night, how will we know when to sleep?

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Travis Hoewischer

I've been working in journalism in central Ohio for more than a decade, and have been lucky enough to be a part of (614) Magazine since the very first issue. Proud to live in a city that still cares – and still reads.

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